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The idea floating city in the middle of the ocean, no smoke, no dust, no waste

The idea floating city in the middle of the ocean, no smoke, no dust, no waste
All buildings are constructed of sustainable materials like wood and bamboo. They are also designed to be disassembled so future generations of architects can redesign it. At a roundtable on April 3, the United Nations identified the floating city as a solution for coastal countries, which are very sensitive to rising sea levels. Also at the conference was the design of a floating city designed by Bjarke Ingels and Oceanix City, a UN-funded project that can accommodate up to 10,000 residents, resist flooding and rage. room level 5. Basically, this is a collection of hexagonal floating platforms, each containing about 300 inhabitants. By designing each floating platform like a hexagon, builders hope to minimize the amount of construction materials needed. The design team considers a group of six floating platforms to be a “village”. Ingels said 10,000 people were the ideal number of residents, as it would allow the island to produce energy, fresh water and heat. In addition, the villages will not allow any high emission vehicles to join the traffic. The floating city also has no garbage trucks, instead the pipes that carry the garbage to the center are categorized and recycled. The design could allow many devices to operate on their own, but the preferred technologies would include cargo transport by unmanned aircraft and submerged food farming. Cages under the foundation can harvest scallops, kelp or other seafood. Hydroponic systems will use fish waste to help fertilize plants, while vertical farms produce products year-round. Both technologies can also help the city become self-sufficient in terms of storms or natural disasters. In general, all are for the purpose of reducing waste and producing all the food needed to feed the city’s residents. In addition, although known as “floating city”, the floor plates are anchored to the bottom of the ocean. Oceanix envisions villages that will be located within about 1.6 km off the major coastal cities. Floating platforms can also be towed to safer locations in the event of a disaster. These panels will be made from Biorock, the material has three times more limestone than concrete but can still float. This substance becomes harder over time, even repairing itself as long as it is still in contact with the water. This allows it to withstand extreme weather conditions. The city is also equipped with a system to separate clean water from the air. Housing blocks must also be designed not too high with a low center of gravity (no more than 7 floors), to ensure safety in storm conditions. In addition to houses, the city will have a religious center, cultural center and library, where residents can rent computers, bicycles and books. All buildings will be built from sustainable materials like wood and bamboo. They are also designed to be disassembled so future generations of architects can easily redesign. Ingels calls his vision of the city “utopian pragmatism” – a way of describing people who can perform great feats in many concrete, practical directions. Of course, not everyone can live under water, but people who cannot afford to rent large cities or want a natural-friendly experience can benefit from this concept. Ingels is also famous for projects such as the Superkilen public park in Copenhagen, Denmark or a twisted pair of towers in New York City, USA. Sharing with Business Insider, Ingels said that designing the entire hexagonal city gave him the opportunity to expand his vision. “At a city scale, you can do more,” Ingels said.